Sleeping Level

We decided it was time to make camping slightly more comfortable, with the simple addition of levels on the outside of the trailer.  So when we arrive at a campsite all we have to do is use the levels when we set up.

The two self-adhesive levels cost us about $10, and took about 20 minutes of our time.

We put the Boler on jacks in our garage, and used two levels on the floor.  One going each direction.  Once both levels indicated that we were level, we stuck the trailer levels on the Boler.

We put one on the back of the Boler centered in the middle underneath the window.  We put the other one beside the door.

20140804 - Sleeping Level_IMGP6336We decided not to screw them as to not add more holes to the Boler.  If at some point they fall off, we’ll add screws.  But, so far they have stuck on really well through rain, sun, wind and road travel.

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Epic Fail

After finishing up the cabinet door upgrade (see the posts here and here), we took the Boler out for a weekend of fun.

Of course, we headed the mountains.  And in order to get to the mountains we had to drive over standard city roads and some highways.  Nothing extreme, or so we thought.

About 3 hours later we arrived at our destination.  And we discovered that multiple doors did not stay shut for the maiden voyage and the closet door did not survive.  I forgot to take photos of the complete disaster that awaited us when we opened the Boler door upon arrival, but from the photo I did take you can see that the closet door trip is mostly still hanging and the inside of the door is resting on the floor.  You will notice the closet is nearly empty because everything was relocated to the floor during travel.

Ops.

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The Cabinet Door Reveal

As I mentioned the other day, we spent a lot of time this summer making new cabinet doors for our Boler.

Our neighbour offered to help us with finishing up the doors, as he’s skilled in cabinetry making.  So, a few days after we gave him all the pieces, they came back fully assembled and absolutely beautiful!

20150723 - A Significant15We were so excited to get to work that we skipped our evening run and spent night in the garage prepping and painting the doors.

First, we sanded.  And then we sanded some more.

Then we used a pre-stain wood condition.  (I have no idea why this step is necessary, but the friendly people at Home Depot said to do it and for the minimal extra cost and time we did).

20150724 - The Cabinet Door Reveal_IMGP5854After lots of thought we decided to use a simple wood stain.

And once again I laid out everything on the deck to admire the final product before we installed them.

20150724 - The Cabinet Door Reveal_IMGP6314The latches were a bit of a pain in the butt as we used a different style then previous. We changed the style in part because it was hard to find pieces similar to the original ones, and the trim didn’t lend itself easy to the old style. We ultimately chose to use a style common in modern day trailers, which meant we had to figure out how to make it work with our old fiberglass Boler. We eventually got it, and now the doors lock securely when closed. Hopefully they also stay secure while we are driving!

It was the first, and hopefully last time we will build cupboard doors, and we think they turned out rather well. And honestly, it has completely changed the look of the inside of the Boler.

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A Significant Upgrade: New Cabinet Doors

If you remember from our initial Boler photos, the cupboards were still original and had seen better days. We didn’t spend the time on this last year as new cupboards were not required for us to go camping, but now that we had some time it only made sense to tackle this cosmetic upgrade.

We wondered around Home Depot trying to figure out what type of design we wanted for our cupboards. In the end, being economic and ever practical we chose to use pine for the doors. We did use one side finished pine and pine trim pieces.

20150723 - A Significant3

Then, we cut all the pine back pieces to size. This was easy as we used the original doors as templates.

Next was the trim pieces. First we cut the trim to the right size, this was pretty easy and even I had a turn playing with the compound mitre saw.

20150723 - A Significant6The trim pieces also had to be cut with the table saw to trim them to the right size. This task was took a bit of precision, so G was in charge of the cutting.

20150723 - A Significant14 Once everything was cut, I laid out all the pieces to admire our handy work.

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Then we moved onto assembly. I set up a pocket-hole jig to drill in pocket holes that would allow G to assembly the frame and ultimately hide the screws. This took a bit of time, but only because there are so many doors. In fact, once we got going we were pretty quick.

Once again, I laid everything out to admire our handywork.  Of course, G rolled his eyes at me.

20150723 - A Significant15Up next, we had to router everything to make the actual doors. This is where we got a bit lucky.  Rather than learning how to router we handed everything over to our neighbour who happens to be a retired teacher and cabinet maker.

While our neighbour had the pieces, we decided to find new cabinet door hardware to hang everything. We picked up the door closing apparatus’/latches and hinges at a RV Parts store – in fact, we bought so many we cleared out there stock and had to go to about 5 RV stores to find enough matching ones. We picked up the handles at Home Depot.

Coming soon, the finished product!

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